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cap in hand

there’s an irony

in that
camouflage hat

worn
by the ‘open mic’ poet

who wishes to be
heard

though not seen.

first published at Livina Press in Issue 7 by E-i-C Laci Felker

livinapress.com 

Cook - Eat

Yorkshire Pudding

Mum’s sister Aunty Bloss - For a special party there would be sausage rolls, small meat pies and pasties and sandwiches, not a great deal different from family gatherings today. Mum Emily made lovely meat pies, steak and kidney pudding, pasties and her Yorkshire pudding was to die for. Lois Moore
Sister Lyn - Kelly’s favourite to the point where she always said she wanted a Yorkshire Pudding for her 21st birthday cake. As she was in London at that time I don’t know if she got her wish. Lyn Macdonald
1 cup plain flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 eggs
½ cup milk
½ cup water
dripping (or oil in lieu)
Sift flour and salt into bowl, make a well in centre, add whole eggs.
Gradually beat in a little flour from the sides of bowl.
Add combined milk and water a little at a time, beating constantly and incorporating more flour from sides of bowl.
When all is combined, beat well for 2 mins, allow mixture to stand for 30 mins. For individual puddings put ½ teaspoon of dripping in each of 12 deep patty tins, heat in hot oven for 2 mins.
Fill each patty tin with batter, bake in hot oven 10 mins or until golden brown.
To make one big Pudding, heat 30 grams (1oz) dripping in 1 1/2 litre (6 cup) ovenproof dish in hot oven.
Pour in batter.
Bake 15 to 20 mins or until well puffed and golden,
This size makes the more traditional pudding with a moist centre. The small puddings are lighter in texture, some prefer this, as they’re attractive and easy to serve.

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